Archive

Contingency of the Now #2

3-12 October 2014, NLHspace

What potential does the use of digital media offer in developing intimate relations, and how does it affect the way we experience presence? Contingency of the Now #2 continued the investigation of structures and processes of presence, this time focusing on the possibilities of modern technology. Over two weekends the performance artist, Melanie Jame Wolf, explored digital media and intimate experiences in the two performances: Far Away..So Close and Touch//Screen.

 

Melanie Jame Wolf

Far Away…So Close

Performed on 3, 4, 5 October 2014

Far Away…So Close was a participatory one-to-one performance about the modern condition of love and distance. This playful, yet poignant piece explored the question ‘If intimacy happens in one to one performance through the spaces between audience and artist, can this intimacy be experienced just as strongly from a distance?’ Far Away…So Close proposed itself as a video call performance and drew on the tropes and codes of call technology as a very contemporary means of maintaining intimacy over distance – between friends, family, lovers and new acquaintances.

Far Away…So Close was first developed as a commission for TheatreWorks, St. Kilda (AU) in 2012-2013.

The performance was complimented by the video series Far Away Pillows that could be viewed from the street during the weekend. The video was a visual chronicle and a comment on globalised mobility and the nomadic requirements of contemporary art practice.

Far Away…So Close

Melanie Jame Wolf, Far Away…So Close, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

Melanie Jame Wolf, Far Away…So Close, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

 

Touch//Screen

Performed on 10, 11, 12 October 2014

Touch//Screen invited audiences to participate in a one-to-one performative conversation work in NLHspace, which occurred on and between screen and bodies in the space. Considering the screen as a third space of intersubjectivity the performance explored how the digital self could be regarded less as prosthesis and more as scope for the sensual in relation to identity and others. Touch//Screen was proposed as an experimental response to questions raised out of making and showing Far Away…So Close, such as: Are we now thoroughly fatigued by privileging the mediated over the live and is there really a distinction between the two? How is our increasingly daily inhabitation of screen spaces inflected by our memories of cinema, and what are the productive limitations of the screen?

Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

Melanie Jame Wolf, Touch//Screen, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

Photo: Melanie Jame Wolf

Melanie Jame Wolf, Touch//Screen, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Melanie Jame Wolf

Photo: Melanie Jame Wolf

Melanie Jame Wolf, Touch//Screen, 2014 NLHspace.  Photo: Melanie Jame Wolf

Photo: Melanie Jame Wolf

Melanie Jame Wolf, Touch//Screen, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Melanie Jame Wolf

 

Contingency of the Now #1

16-29 June 2014, NLHspace

What is presence and how does it relate to time and endurance? What is its role today, and what potential does it have? With these questions the performance series Contingency of the Now #1 explored processes and structures of presence. During two weeks the artists Nanna Lysholt Hansen, Trine Mee Sook Gleerup and Maline Casta investigated notions of presence in their performance practice as it opened up for broader questions on cultural and political structures.

 

Nanna Lysholt Hansen

Dear Daughter / Motherboard Theories of Evolution (w/ Braidotti, Plant et aliae)

Performed on 16, 17, 18 June 2014

Adding small changes to the performance each evening Nanna Lysholt Hansen explored the relation between text, body and attentiveness of the audience, while she investigated the multitasking of her own thinking and working as a mother, artist and perhaps as a computer. The performance was a spoken patchwork of text fragments on the subject of women in relation to history, technology and language. Partly poetic, partly to the point of fracture, the text took the form of a speech and a conversation with the artist’s 6-month-old daughter.

Nanna Lysholt Hansen Motherboard

Nanna Lysholt Hansen, Dear Daughter / Motherboard Theories of Evolution (w/ Braidotti, Plant et aliae), 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Nanna Lysholt Hansen

Nanna Lysholt Hansen Motherboard

Nanna Lysholt Hansen, Dear Daughter / Motherboard Theories of Evolution (w/ Braidotti, Plant et aliae), 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Nanna Lysholt Hansen

Nanna Lysholt Hansen Motherboard

Nanna Lysholt Hansen, Dear Daughter / Motherboard Theories of Evolution (w/ Braidotti, Plant et aliae), 2014 NLHspace.  Photo: Nanna Lysholt Hansen

 

Trine Mee Sook Gleerup

OHM: a meditative performance lecture & how our mind and body are practically commercialized

Performed on 21 June 2014

In her performance Trine Mee Sook Gleerup investigated various modes of presence in relation to performance art, the performing subject and mindfulness. Taking into account that the core of mindfulness is presence, the performance merged practical excises of mindfulness and yoga with performance theory, autobiographical material and critical discourse – questioning the popularity or even, as you might say, the regime of mindfulness as it appears in a Western context.

OHM1

Trine Mee Sook Gleerup, OHM: a meditative performance lecture & how our mind and body are practically commercialized, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Eva Wandel

OHM2

Trine Mee Sook Gleerup, OHM: a meditative performance lecture & how our mind and body are practically commercialized, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Eva Wandel

OHM4

Trine Mee Sook Gleerup, OHM: a meditative performance lecture & how our mind and body are practically commercialized, 2014 NLHspace.  Photo: Eva Wandel

OHM3

Trine Mee Sook Gleerup, OHM: a meditative performance lecture & how our mind and body are practically commercialized, 2014 NLHspace.  Photo: Eva Wandel

Text presented at the performance: Trine Mee Sook Gleerup_text fragments

 

Maline Casta

We’re in this together

Performed on 27, 28, 29 June 2014

In her durational performance Maline Casta explored the connection and possible interaction between daydreaming and presence. At different hours during the three days the audience was invited to share a mutual experience in the space between reality and imagination. The performance departs from the notion that our daydreams, like the experience of presence, are often very private and yet they tell us about the political climate we live in and how we relate to each other.

Maline Casta We're in this together

Maline Casta, We’re in this together, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

Maline Casta We're in this together

Maline Casta, We’re in this together, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

Maline Casta We're in this together

Maline Casta, We’re in this together, 2014 NLHspace. Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

Maline Casta We're in this together

Maline Casta, We’re in this together, 2014 NLHspace.  Photo: Rie Hovmann Rasmussen

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